Participatory Art Based Research (PABR)

The research project PABR evaluates the methodologies and formats developed in the course of the two art based research programs Assembly and Participation (2012-2014) and Performing Citizenship (2015-2018). It aims to present coherent approaches of participatory art based research derived from the conducted 20 experimental, participatory, transdisciplinary, and artistic research projects carried out within the programs. To advance research in between academia, art and social practices the project will describe ways of working and best practice models and provide them in an online publication on how to conduct participatory art based research.

In a first phase the existing experiences, data and formats from the various projects are analyzed and charted into more general approaches. In a second phase the derived results are tested in newly conceived art based research projects. Hence, the project unites research ON and WITH artistic practices.

The approach of participatory art based research situates itself in the international discourse on art based research, as well as in citizen and participatory research, and tries to expand both with its combination. A focus of this research project rests on the verification that art based research has the potential to open academic research and make it more inclusive.

In April 2020 we hold a conference to put forward our results and organize a workshop for further discussion.

 

Members: Dr. des. Maike Gunsilius, Dr. Sebastian Matthias
HafenCity University Hamburg (HCU): Prof. Dr. Kathrin Wildner
FUNDUS THEATER/ Theatre of Research: PD Dr. Sibylle Peters
K3 – Zentrum für Choreographie | Tanzplan Hamburg: Dr. Kerstin Evert

Contact: PABR@hcu-hamburg.dehttp://pab-research.org/

 

Participatory Art Based Research is a cooperation of the HafenCity University Hamburg with FUNDUS THEATER / Theatre of Research and K3 | Tanzplan Hamburg and is funded by:

explore dance - Network dance for young audience

Tanzpakt Stadt-Land-Bund

explore dance – network dance for young audience is the joint project by Focus Dance – Dance and Schools association Munich, fabrik Potsdam and K3 | Tanzplan Hamburg and will close a national gap in the cultural offer for children and young people, as it aims at the long-term consolidation and artistic development of dance for young audiences. In the next three performance seasons, established choreographers within the national German network will be invited to Potsdam, Munich and Hamburg to develop and present new works for young audiences. Reciprocal guest performances will enable the pieces to be seen at different places. The new productions will be brought together in an annual festvial in one of the three partner cities and offer the opportunity to meet organisers, artists, the young audiences, educators and parents. A subsequent symposium on the theme of dance for young people will boost the exchange of information, ideas and experience at the national and international level.  The festivals will take place in Hamburg in 2019, in Munich in 2020 and in Potsdam in 2021. Each of the three institutions will also be establishing long-term co-operations with local schools in order to integrate the target group directly into the artists’ work processes. The project will thus lay the foundation for a sustainable, continuous and high-quality event and transfer programme in contemporary dance for children and young people, aged from 5 to 15, and strengthen the visibility of contemporary dance as an art from in the field of performance arts for young audiences.

 
explore dance – Network dance for young audience is a co-operative project of fabrik moves Potsdam, Fokus Tanz / Tanz und Schule e.V. München and K3 | Tanzplan Hamburg. Funded by TANZPAKT Stadt-Land-Bund with the support of the German Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media, the Ministry of Culture and Media of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, the Municipal Department of Arts and Culture Munich and the BLZT, financed by the Bavarian Ministry for Arts and Education, as well as the city of Potsdam and the ministry for science, research and culture of the federal state of Brandenburg.
 

 

Empowering Dance – Developing Soft Skills

Soft skills are personal attributes that can affect relationships, communication, and interaction with others. Complex problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, intercultural skills and teamwork are – according to the World Economic Forum –regarded as the most important skills required in our contemporary society and in the workplace.

This project – funded in the frame of the EU progamme Erasmus+ – aims to provide evidence on how the practice of contemporary dance helps personal and interpersonal development. The project shared by 5 partner institutions (Centro per la Scena Contemporanea in Bassano Del Grappa, Dansateliers in Rotterdam, HIPP in Zagreb, La Briqueterie – CDCN du Val-de-Marne in Vitry-sur-Seine, K3 | Tanzplan Hamburg) is based on the idea that a continuous contemporary dance practice helps people deal with change, build resilience, gain confidence and develop healthier interpersonal relationships. However, there is little evidence to date recorded about the implicit but powerful skills of contemporary dance.

Knowledge that is specific to dance is often implied or “silent” knowledge, operating in the background and rarely named (in detail) for its unique impact and potential in diverse settings. This project will identify, collect and articulate the implicit skills developed through dance practice by focusing on five examples of contemporary dance practices involving a community of non-professionals.

In The Netherlands, the research will focus on the Movement Class programmes, organised by Dansateliers since 2012. These are a series of classes led by different choreographers and open to anyone interested in body awareness, choreography and dance.

In Italy, the research will focus on Dance Well, a process which has been promoting for over 5 years the regular practice of dance and the participation in dance events for people living with Parkinson's, their family members and members of the elderly community of the region.

In France, the research will be centred on the on-going artistic work of Jordi Galí, Artist-in-residence, involving a mixed group of non-professionals, including migrants and refugees.

In Germany, the project will look at the practice and legacy of the K3 Youth Dance Group. The K3 Youth Club, founded in 2007, is open to youth age 15 and older. Each season, in collaboration with experienced choreographers, the Youth Club develops a production that is presented on stage in professional conditions.

In Croatia the project will follow the impact of students of dance in a professional dance school that may be considering dance as a future career.

A series of good-practice sharing meetings with the staff of five European dance houses, dance practitioners with diverse practices and their local communities are planned between January 2019 and January 2020 in different partners’ cities.

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

360° Communicating Dance

Online Communication Toolkit

The website www.communicatingdance.eu is the result of the EU project 360° Building Strategies for Communication in Contemporary Dance, co-funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Union.

It was created to assist dance professionals to develop their thinking, skills and practices in the area of communication with all key stakeholders in their career.

The title 360° highlights that communication in contemporary dance does not only include the traditional understanding of communication (press work, marketing, PR, etc.) but that communication starts in the moment a choreographer begins a creative process. 360° communication in this sense refers to all possible people and target groups the artist might encounter during the process and can include: cooperation partners, presenters, stakeholders, team members, collaborators, journalists and audiences. It can also include institutions such as funding bodies, venues, theatres and festivals and, as such it also includes staff members of the different departments of each institution (from the technical department to the artistic director).

Over the course of 16 months, this project allowed a series of best-practice sharing meetings with the staff of six European dancehouses, international communication experts and many dance practitioners at different career stages with diverse practices. The result of this journey is a toolkit, that aims at encouraging professionals in the field of dance and the performing arts to:


Think:

This text examines key words we identified on our journey that are crucial for successful communication in the field of contemporary dance: http://www.communicatingdance.eu/tools/think

Use:
A collection of practical advice, useable templates and FAQs on press and marketing issues.
http://www.communicatingdance.eu/tools/use

Play:
A modular tool that inspires dance professionals to create (and play!) with their own communication plan in a visual, interactive format.
http://www.communicatingdance.eu/tools/play

Project Partners:
Centro per la Scena Contemporanea, Bassano Del Grappa; Dance Ireland, Dublin; Dansateliers, Rotterdam; Hrvatski institut za pokret i ples, Zagreb; K3 – Zentrum für Choreographie | Tanzplan Hamburg / Kampnagel; La Briqueterie - CDCN du Val-de-Marne, Vitry-sur-Seine.

Project Duration: September 2016 to December 2017.

www.communicatingdance.eu


The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Reflex Europe

REFLEX Europe researched and used documenting as a tool for reflection in order to improve the teaching and to increase the impact on the learners in contemporary dance. It was a partnership of 8 European organisation working in the field of contemporary dance and its education.

At the core of REFLEX Europe was the Research Group consisting of 11 dance teachers and experts in dance video and dance writing. Over the course of three years (September 2015 until August 2018) the Research Group developed the REFLEX Tool & Guide in a series of Research Modules.

The summerly IDOCDE symposium which is held each year at ImPulsTanz Vienna International Dance Festival complemented the research of REFLEX Europe. Next to its function as peer to peer platform for exchange among dance artists and teachers the symposium relates the project progress to the interested audience and with its help and feedback the REFLEX Tool & Guide were developed further.

In the last project year, outreach workshops and a final master class disseminated project results. Furthemore, an online-publication was published. Mind the Dance is a collection of essays, texts and practical tools for all artists and teachers who are interested in the creative documentation of movement: www.mindthedance.com

REFLEX Europe was funded by the European Union and collaborated closely with the online network for contemporary dance and teaching, IDOCDE (international documentation of contemporary dance education) for publication of the REFLEX Tool & Guide, for networking and feedback.

Research Group: Amir Avraham, Bertha Bermúdez Pascual, Defne Erdur, Eszter Gál, Sabina Holzer, Nicolas Hubert, Andrea Keiz, Kerstin Kussmaul, Friederike Lampert, Anouk Llaurens, Ulla Mäkinen, Barbara Meneses, Martin Streit, John Taylor, Suzan Tunca

Partner Organisations: Wiener Tanzwochen (AT), K3 – Zentrum für Choreographie | Tanzplan Hamburg (DE), Tanzplattform Rhein-Main (DE), SíN Culture Center (HU), North Karelia College Outokumpu (FI), Le Pacifique (FR), ICKamsterdam (NL), Elim Sende (TR)



The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.